Reporting progress in the garden

The great thing about gardens is that you can see where you have been. You can enjoy the fruits of your labour and are never left wondering if what you have done has made a difference. I spent a whole day in my garden yesterday weeding and cutting back and restoring order ready for the winter. I inherited a pittosporum when I moved to my house and I was going to get rid of it but decided to try to cut it into a shape…too basic to call topiary…just a sphere. I embarked on a hair cut for it and once again had to face the facts of life for the vertically challenged. There are always bits you cannot reach.

However I hacked back the lavender and pulled out all remaining foxglove and delphinium stalks and even mowed my tiny patch of lawn. See before and after..a most satisfying day’s work.

Before a day's work in the garden

Before a day's work in the garden

After: the fruits of a day's graft

After: the fruits of a day's graft

I can also report that my carrots and parsnips and leeks planted only a few weeks ago are thriving.

Carrots, parsnips and leeks well under way

Carrots, parsnips and leeks well under way

See the growth in my healthy Nellie Kelly passionfruit. It seems the lamb’s fry has done the trick.

Nellie Kelly passionfruit doing well

Nellie Kelly passionfruit doing well

I also noticed that my Tahitian and Kaffir limes have both fruited well but it seems that there is no use for the fruit of the kaffir lime, is that the case? I’d be glad ot hear from anyone if there is something that can be done with them.

My Kaffir lime tree

My Kaffir lime tree

Fragrant frangipani in bloom

Fragrant frangipani in bloom

Finally look at my frangipani. I am so thrilled to see the flowers and as I eat my breakfast the perfume wafts around and I could be sitting in a tropical garden in Bali about to eat banana pancakes with lime juice, except that I am not.

I did harvest my rhubarb but there wasn’t enough to make rhubarb champagne, (next time Gimila), so I reverted to the tried and true and stewed some apples and rhubarb and had that instead.

2 thoughts on “Reporting progress in the garden

  1. I’ve also seen/heard of the zest being used in curry paste/curries as well as the leaves (I saw a chef finely grate some zest into a recipe, but I don’t remember what it was – possibly in an Indonesian dish).

    I’m looking forward to trying some recipes and experimenting once our kaffir lime starts producing. We have a fairly new garden so we’re waiting for most of the fruit trees to start producing 🙂

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