Returning home to daffodils, daphne and winter roses

Winter colour from my hellebores

Winter colour from my hellebores

Returning from a tumultuous week in Canberra, I found my daffodils and hellebores have begun to flower.I have been lucky enough to have several varieties of hellebores thanks to the wonderful Barbara Jenkins and her love of these winter roses. She has bred several different colours and I am looking forward to the colour they bring to a winter garden.

My daphne is also about to flower. I love the perfume of daphne as it reminds me of my grandmother’s garden.

Daphne: memories of my Grandmother's garden

Daphne: memories of my Grandmother's garden

As a child our family used to visit my grandparent’s house for tea on a Sunday evening. Frequently my grandmother would have picked small posies of polyanthus, daphne, grape hyacinths and the like to give to teachers and my sister and I would dutifully head off to Wesley Vale Area School the next morning with posies in hand. I suppose primary school children still do that sometimes although I suspect it is more of a country practise. It must be one of the joys of being a primary school teacher.

Warm colours in winter

Warm colours in winter

Returning from a tumultuous week in Canberra, I found my daffodils and hellebores have begun to flower . I have been lucky enough to have several varieties of hellebores thanks to the wonderful Barbara Jenkins and her love of these winter roses. She has bred several different colours and I am looking forward to the colour they bring to a winter garden.

My daphne is also about to flower. I love the perfume of daphne as it reminds me of my grandmother’s garden. As a child our family used to visit my grandparent’s house for tea on a Sunday evening. Frequently my grandmother would have picked small posies of polyanthus, daphne, grape hyacinths and the like to give to teachers and my sister and I would dutifully head off to Wesley Vale Area School the next morning with posies in hand. I suppose primary school children still do that sometimes although I suspect it is more of a country practise. It must be one of the joys of being a primary school teacher.

One thought on “Returning home to daffodils, daphne and winter roses

  1. Hi Christine, your post was the topic of a dinner conversation: the flowers we remember from our grandmothers’ gardens.

    Daphne was in the gardens of all of our grandparents, and deservedly so with that exquisite perfume.

    Daphne, grape hyacinths, jonquils and daffodils – isn’t it wonderful what memories a plant can trigger.

    I hope kids today have time for garden experiences where they can learn and play and grow to love plants that will become part of their lives. It’s so good to see the kids at the schools you visit developing a passion for growing things.

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